Labs

Organismal Patterning

Team Leader
Hiroshi Hamada (M.D., Ph.D.)

My lab studies how left-right asymmetries develop in the mouse embryo. In particular, we focus on two types of cilia that are required for left-right symmetry breaking: rotating cilia that generate leftward fluid flow, and immotile cilia that sense the fluid flow. We also study the role of maternal epigenetic regulators in pre-implantation development. We address these questions by integrating live imaging, structural biology, fluid dynamics and mathematical modeling.

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hiroshi.hamada[at]riken.jp

Recruit

Three steps that generate left-right asymmetry
Role of motile and immotile cilia in left-right symmetry breaking
Maternal epigenome in early cell specification
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